James Galway  
James Galway gained fame as one of Ireland's most popular flautists in the late '70s. Over the next two decades, Galway's smooth, lightly Celtic instrumental stylings were internationally popular, selling numerous records and earning him several awards.

Galway began playing music with penny whistles and mouth-organs as a child, soon moving to flute. At the age of ten, he was the winner of all three classes of the Irish Flute Championships, which earned him a BBC radio session, as well as a spot in the Belfast Youth Orchestra. Galway earned scholarships first at London's Guildhall School of Music, then the Paris Conservatoire; he would occasionally busk on the subways to earn extra money.

After spending some time at Sadlers Wells, Galway became the Berlin Philharmonic's principal flautist in 1969. His time with the orchestra was popular, which led his manager, Michael Emerson, to persuade the flautist to go solo in 1975. Galway was instantly successful as a solo artist, both as a live performer and a recording artist. He was soon playing 120 concerts a year, as well as recording both classical and popular albums. In 1978, his version of John Denver's "Annie's Song" became an international hit. While his pop recordings were commercially successful, his classical albums were warmly recepted by critics and peers alike, as his records of Mozart and Vivaldi compositions won awards.

Though he wasn't able to replicate the success of "Annie's Song" in the '80s, he continued to sell out concerts around the world well into the '90s and his infrequent records have proven nearly as successful. Stephen Thomas Erlewine, All-Music Guide

Dick Gaughan  
Though primarily steeped in the traditions of folk and Celtic music, Scottish singer/songwriter Dick Gaughan enjoyed a lengthy and far-reaching career in a variety of creative pursuits. Born Richard Peter in 1948, he first picked up the guitar at the age of seven, and issued his debut solo LP No More Forever in 1972. Gaughan then signed on with the folk-rock group the Boys of the Lough, releasing a 1973 self-titled LP before returning to his solo career with 1976's Kist o Gold. However, he soon returned to the group format, forming a band named Five Hand Reel and issuing another eponymously titled effort that same year; over the next two years, Gaughan issued four more records -- two solo releases (1977's Copper and Brass and 1978's Gaughan) as well as two more Five Hand Reel outings (1977's For A' That and 1978's Earl o' Moray). In the late 1970s and early 1980s, he worked as a critic and columnist with Folk Review magazine, and also acted as a member of the 7:84 Theatre Company; after a three-year absence from the studio, Gaughan also returned to regular musical duty with the release of 1981's Handful of Earth. A Different Kind of Love Song followed in 1983, and in 1985 he released Live in Edinburgh; True and Bold appeared a year later. After 1988's Call It Freedom, Gaughan again retreated from view; much of his time was devoted to his increasing interest in computer technology, and he later earned notice for his skills as a programmer and web designer. Finally, he formed a new band, the short-lived Chan Alba, which disbanded after releasing their 1995 self-titled debut; the solo Sail On arrived the next year, followed in 1998 by Redwood Cathedral. Jason Ankeny, All-Music Guide

Frankie Gavin  
Frankie Gavin comes from Connemara, one of the Irish-speaking areas of Ireland. He is best known as De Dannan's fiddle player, but he also plays the flute and records solo records. Steve Winick, All-Music Guide

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